TORONTO FACADISM 1

By Richard Longley

SELF-GUIDED WALK

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DETAILS

Language: English 

Area: Downtown

Theme: Arts & Architecture, History & Culture

Accessibility: Family-friendly, Fast-Paced, Triggering Content

WALK DESCRIPTION:

Facadism - “facodomy”, “urban taxidermy”, “heritage crushed” - it might be the dirtiest word in the architectural conservationist’s dictionary. It’s epidemic in downtown Toronto, but is it a disease? Visit 24 buildings in downtown Toronto.

 

Check the combination of the old with the new. Note the heritage skills required to restore these facades. Look at newer buildings around you to see if you can find any with late 2th or early 21zt century facades that are as compelling.

QUEEN/YONGE – FRONT – ALLEN LAMBERT GALLERIA – BAY – ADELAIDE – SCOTIABANK – ADELAIDE WEST – KING – JOHN – MERCER – PETER – RICHMOND WEST – QUEEN

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Facadism - “facodomy”, “urban taxidermy”, “heritage crushed” - it might be the dirtiest word in the architectural conservationist’s dictionary. It’s epidemic in downtown Toronto, but is it a disease?

Facadism cannot be popular among architects, who’d rather design buildings that are wholly their own but if building new, above, behind or inside the skins of heritage buildings, is so heinous, why is it so common it might be considered an architectural movement? Is it because Torontonians have lost so much of their city’s past, they are determined to hold on to fragments, at least, of what remains? Or is it because so many architects seem to have lost the knack of creating facades that do what facades are supposed to do: invite, intrigue, enchant, awe, impress or even intimidate. Why is it so hard to find much of that in the faces of the buildings of today?

Whatever the reason, in Toronto, that is clearcutting and replanting itself, at a pace that transforms its skyline month by month, facadism is epidemic, with results that can be bizarre, grotesque or ridiculous but most times, much more than that.

During this Facadism 1 walk, consider the skills that built and restored the buildings, on its route; skills that facadism employs abundantly. If you’d like to see more, try Facadism Walk 2

START: YONGE-QUEEN STREETS, SOUTHWEST CORNER (FOR BEST VIEWS NORTHWEST CORNER)

STOP 1: PHILIP JAMIESON CLOTHIER, OUTFITTER, 2 QUEEN STREET WEST/218 YONGE ST

S. H. Knox C0. – Toys, 1910-1913, F. W. Woolworth, 1913-1960s, Royal Bank, Tower Records. Demolition and reconstruction by Zeidler Partnership, Clifford Restoration (in progress) with ERA Heritage Architects for Cadillac Fairview

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NORTHEAST CORNER

STOP 2: BANK OF MONTREAL, 173 YONGE ST, 2 QUEEN ST E, PEARSON & DARLING, ARCHITECTS, 1909-1910. 20-STOREY OFFICE TOWER, 2003, WEBB-ZERAFA MENKES HOUSTON ARCHITECTS

Italianate Renaissance Style with classical detailing. Terracotta tiles by Doulton & Co.

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CROSS YONGE STREET TO EAST SIDE, WALK SOUTH TO SEE BUILDINGS ON WEST SIDE

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STOP 3: UPPER CANADA BIBLE TRACT SOCIETY NOW PIZZAIOLO, 104 YONGE STREET, GORDON & HELLIWELL ARCHITECTS, 1886.

Altered in 1910 for Dunfield and Company. 1985-86 facade incorporated into the Scotia Plaza.

 

(Present home of the Canadian Bible Society is 10 Carnforth Road, North York.)

STOP 4: ROBERT FAIRWEATHER HOUSE OF QUALITY, 100 YONGE ST., C. S. COBB ARCHITECTS, 1919

A façade that does what retail facades are supposed to do, regardless of merchandise: intrigue and invite. Now Moore’s Clothing for Men and façade of “a 15 storey granite clad office tower” (by Quadrangle Architects, 1989) “that looks spare and elegant, making the attached historical facade more incongruous”. Note the “FAIR WEATHER” sun above the second-floor window and “THE HOVSE OF QUALITY” in the cornice.

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WALK SOUTH DOWN YONGE STREET, EAST SIDE, CROSS BLOOR, CONTINUE

STOP 6: SUD FORNO, 132 YONGE STREET, BAY ADELAIDE CENTRE E/DELOITTE TOWER 22 ADELAIDE STREET WEST KPMB AND ADAMSON ASSOCIATES, ARCHITECTS WITH ERA HERITAGE ARCHITECTS, 2016. ORIGINALLY ELGIN BLOCK, 1850S, AT CORNER OF YONGE AND ADELAIDE WEST, REBUILT 1910 FOR HOLT RENFREW (JAMES L. HAVILL, ARCHITECT 1910).

In 2014 the 1910 façade was, panellised to allow its safe removal 30m north to the corner of Temperance Street (opposite the beautifully conserved Dineen Coffee building). Directed by ERA Architects, the original façade has been extended south, by a concrete ghost wall that conceals the Bay Adelaide Centre’s mechanical systems.

Inspired by the building-casting art of sculptor Rachel Whiteread this ghost wall is identical in form to the original but its colour and its blind “windows” acknowledge that it is new, in accordance with the “conservation ethic”.

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Construction of the first Bay Adelaide Centre began in 1990. Work was halted one year later, by economic recession and collapse in demand for office space that left a six-storey elevator stump with underground parking to mark the site of what had been intended to be a 57-storey commercial tower.

 

In 2006 the Bay Adelaide Centre - redesigned and more respectful of heritage - was re-launched in two parts, east and west.

STOP 6: DOMINION BANK, 1 KING STREET WEST, PEARSON AND DARLING ARCHITECTS, 1914 ONE KING WEST, STANFORD DOWNEY ARCHITECT, 2005

The most elegant postmodern residential building in Toronto? 176m, 51-storey tower (“the most slender in the world”), is anchored in a 12-storey podium that was once main branch of the Dominion Bank that closed in the 1960s when the Dominion Bank combined with the Bank of Toronto to form the Toronto Dominion Bank that is now housed in Ludwig Mies van der Rohe’s TD Centre.

The condo tower’s slender height to width ratio requires its stabilization by a 465sq m mass damper with 10 compartments full of water to prevent swaying in the wind.

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STOP 7: 36-48 YONGE STREET, 1-9 WELLINGTON STREET WEST

The buildings that wrap around the north-east corner of Alan Lambert Galleria were built between the mid 19th and early 20th centuries. They survived the great fire of 1904 but today, all that remains of them are their facades, restored by Spencer Higgins, Architect to resemble the original shopfronts.

 

What is left is seen by Urban Designer Bob Allsopp (who gave us “urban taxidermy”) as a “diorama” with doors that are mostly locked and marked with instructions to find access inside Brookfield Place.

Where the facade terminates at the PARK sign on Wellington Street (at right) is the original site of William Thomas’s Commercial Bank that was dismantled, moved and rebuilt, south of its original location, inside the Alan Lambert Galleria.

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STOP 8: BANK OF MONTREAL, 30 YONGE ST., DARLING AND CURRY ARCHITECTS, 1885 NOW THE HOCKEY HALL OF FAME, B+H WITH KFA ARCHITECTS, SPENCER HIGGINS, HERITAGE ARCHITECT, 1993

Urban Designer Bob Allsopp’s favourite specimen of facadism as “urban taxidermy”. Accessing the Hockey Hall of Fame’s is convoluted and tricky. Instructions on the locked main door direct west to a door into Brookfield Place. From there be prepared to explore sideways, deeply, sideways again.

Note original sculptures by Holbrook and Mollington (including Atlas holding up the chimney that is reproduced as one of his “monsters” by Duane Linklater in the Lower Don Valley Park).

Recent sculptures include “Our Game”, boys on the hockey bench  y Edie Parker (1993) and the Canada ’72 Millennium Tribute (to the defeat of Russia).

On the inside look up to the 75ft diameter stained glass dome with dragons guarding gold by Joseph McCausland & Sons, restored more than 100 years later by his g2 grandson Andrew Mccausland.

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CROSS YONGE STREET, GO WEST ALONG FRONT STREET TO ENTER BROOKFIELD PLACE

ENTER RIGHT (sign to Hockey Hall of Fame) INSIDE, LEFT INTO ALLEN LAMBERT GALLERIA

STOP 9: COMMERCIAL BANK OF THE MIDLAND DISTRICT, WILLIAM THOMAS ARCHITECT, 1844-45 ALLEN LAMBERT GALLERIA, BROOKFIELD PLACE, 181 BAY ST., SANTIAGO CALATRAVA, ARCHITECT, 1992

William Thomas emigrated from England to Toronto in 1843. His many achievements in Canada include Brock’s monument at Queenston Heights and, in Toronto, St Lawrence Hall, St Michael’s Cathedral and Bishop’s Palace, Oakham House, his home at Gould and Church Streets, and the Don Jail. The Commercial Bank of the Midland District, built 1844-45, at 13-15 Wellington Street West, was William Thomas’s first project in Toronto.  In 1992 it was dismantled and its façade was reassembled to front the Canadian Chamber of Commerce, inside the Galleria.

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Allen Lambert president of the Toronto Dominion Bank navigated amalgamation of the Bank of Toronto and the Dominion Bank and building of the TD Centre in the 1960s. He was the brother-in-law of architect and architectural critic Phyllis Lambert who persuaded him to hire Ludwig Mies van der Rohe to be its architect. (As she had previously persuaded her father, Samuel Bronfman, to hire him to design the Seagram Building in New York.) Construction of the TD Centre’s banking hall at King and Bay required demolition of the Bank of Toronto, fragments of which were assembled into the Greek Temple at Guild Park, Scarborough. The Dominion Bank building survived to be incorporated into 1 King Street West, which is on this route. Allen Lambert is also remembered for being the founder of the TD Centre’s considerable collection of indigenous and Canadian contemporary art. 

Santiago Calatrava is famous for being one of the world’s most daring and challenging architects. Structural engineer Morden Yolles, who oversaw the Galleria’s construction, points out that its soaring vault is itself, an example of facadism. The hyperbolic arches that catch the eye are entirely decorative. The real work of roof support is done by the flatter, barely visible steel ribs above them. 

WEST THROUGH ALLEN LAMBERT GALLERIA (WASHROOMS BELOW) TO BAY ST. 

RIGHT (NORTH) UP BAY STREET, EAST SIDE

STOP 10: TORONTO STOCK EXCHANGE, 234 BAY ST., GEORGE AND MOOREHOUSE, ARCHITECTS, 1937.

Façade by S.H. Maw, bas reliefs of Canadian industry by Charles Comfort. 

Design Exchange, Kuwabara Payne McKenna Blumberg, architects, 1994

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Stock Exchange closed 1983, reopened as Design Exchange, 1994. The art deco façade with bas relief by Peter Schoen stands proud on the face of the fourth, “neo-Miesian”, tower of Ludwig Mies 12 van der Rohe’s TD Centre. Behind that façade, the trading floor, the INCO grand staircase, 12m high ceilings and murals by Charles Comfort are restored; with in a building that is enjoying a dignified and creative reuse.

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Bas relief and aluminum doors with images of workers by Peter Schoen. Find the businessman in top hat with his hand in a worker’s pocket, and the only woman on the façade (with microscope).

NORTH TO KING, RIGHT THEN NORTH THROUGH SCOTIA PLAZA TO ADELAIDE STREET NORTH SIDE.

STOP 11: ORIGINALLY JOHN KAY & CO., 40 KING STREET WEST, SAMUEL G. CURRY ARCHITECT, 1898 NOW WINNERS, SCOTIA PLAZA 11 ADELAIDE STREET WEST, WZMH ARCHITECTS, 1988

John Kay & Co. “One of Canada’s largest retailers of linoleums, carpets, rugs, draperies, wallpaper and furniture” by Samuel G. Curry, architect who was also responsible for the Bank of Montreal at Front and Yonge that is now the Hockey Hall of Fame. John Kay’s store was originally located at 36-38 King Street West and ended its life there as the office of Wood Gundy. Demolished in 1988 to allow construction of the Scotia Plaza, its façade was reassembled one block north, at 11 Adelaide West (on the site of the Grand Opera House that was owned by Ambrose Small, who vanished in 1919 and has not been seen since).

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WEST ALONG ADELAIDE, SOUTH SIDE. LOOK NORTH UP BAY TO NATIONAL BLDG THEN CONTINUE ALONG ADELAIDE

STOP 12: NATIONAL BUILDING, 333 BAY STREET, CHAPMAN AND OXLEY ARCHITECTS, 1926 BAY ADELAIDE CENTRE WEST, WZMH ARCHITECTS, GBCA HERITAGE ARCHITECTS, 2009

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The 12-storey National Building at 347 (now 333) Bay Street was designed by the architects of the Princes’ Gates at Exhibition Place, the Sterling Tower at Richmond and Bay, the Bay store (formerly Simpson’s) on Queen, and Sunnyside Bathing Pavilion). In 2009 it was dismantled, to allow construction of the 51-storey Bay Adelaide Centre West. Its façade is now back, wrapped around the corner of Bay and Temperance Street.

15 Conservation of the National Building was to a plan that was approved by City Council prior to passage of the 2005 revisions to the Ontario Heritage Act, which is why its conservation is less than many would like. When he was interviewed by Urban Issues critic, Christopher Hume, Chris Borgal of Goldsmith Borgal Restoration Architects was sanguine about his work on this project: "I took the attitude it was a done deal when I accepted the job, so why not make it look as spectacular as possible? At one level it's a stage set, a painting, a picture. The objective was to preserve some ambience of the Bay Street canyon. It's not a North Toronto Station-Summerhill LCBO or a National Ballet School (two other GBCA projects) but I think it'll be a good job." And a difficult job.

 

There was subsidence to contend, foundations had to be re-dug and re-poured while salt damage to the limestone on the Bay Street side required some of it to be replicated – block for block.

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STOP 13: CONCOURSE BUILDING, 100 ADELAIDE ST. WEST, BALDWIN & GREENE, ARCHITECTS 1928 ERNST & YOUNG BUILDING, KPF WITH WZMH ARCHITECTS, GBCA HERITAGE ARCHITECTS, 2016

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Its 1929 ad read: “The Concourse Building introduces colour for the first time in downtown Toronto. The austerity of eternal grey, which pervades our streets is relieved in this building with a lovely warmth of gold. An office in this building will be more than an office.”

 

Like the National Building, restoration of the art deco Concourse Building involved dismantling of the façade and its re-assembly to the same overall height but with 15 floors instead of 16 above the entrance level, to allow the higher ceilings needed to accommodate 21st century HVAC and cabling. Demolition, re-construction and grafting of the façade on to the 40-storey E&Y tower inspired outrage. For architectural critic Christopher Hume it was “facodomy”. For Alex Bozikovic of the Globe and Mail, a “clash”, a “collision”, “tricky and unsuccessful”, with “bits of the historic façade grafted onto it”. But for Bruce Bell, “Facadism Done Right”.

 

GBCA heritage architect Chris Borgal points out that “the historic bits grafted on” are the entire, most ornate, south and east faces of the Concourse Building. Mosaics by J.E.H. MacDonald (of the Group of 7) and his son Thoreau are restored, as are geometric reliefs on the east side. Lost entrance lamps and bronze doors are replicated from old photographs.

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Inside the Concourse Building: Ceiling panels by Carl Fellman Schaefer (student of J. E. H. MacDonald and Arthur Lismer), revealed, restored, after removal of drop ceilings.

STOP 14: BISHOP’S BLOCK, 192 ADELAIDE STREET WEST, 1829 SOHO HOUSE

James K. M. Cheng and Hariri Pontarini Architects, ERA Heritage Architects 2011

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Five upscale Georgian row houses built “for speculation”, by butcher Joseph Bishop. In 1836, one house was home to Anna Jameson, author of Winter Studies and Summer Ramble in Canada. In the 1850s, the Block was the Adelaide Hotel, and, in the 1970s, the Pretzel Bell Tavern. In 2005 Bishop’s Block was abandoned. In 2007 the condition of its mortar was found to be so poor, it had to be dismantled rather than moved to allow construction of the 63-storey Shangri La Hotel at the corner of University and Adelaide.  

Excavation of the site by Archaeological Services Inc.
 revealed a “complex process of construction, enlargement and demolition since the land patent was granted in 1801.” As well as children's toys, writing slates, smoking pipes, glass and ceramics were found (some of which bore the stamp of Glover Harrison's China Hall that was on nearby King Street). 

Reconstruction required the turning of many of its bricks, during their re-laying, to put their sound faces on the outside. That work was completed in 2011.  

Bishop’s Block is now Soho House, one of an international chain of members’ clubs. February 1, 2017 Prince Harry dined here with Meghan Markle, the future Duchess of Sussex who lived for seven years in Toronto while filming Suits, 2011-2017. 

STOP 15: SOUTHAM PRESS BUILDING, 219-231 ADELAIDE STREET WEST, 19 DUNCAN STREET, SPROATT & ROLPH ARCHITECTS, 1908 2021 BEING RECONSTRUCTED, HARIRI PONTARINI, ERA ARCHITECTS

58-storey mixed-use building including a 9-storey podium (179.5 metres, excluding elevator overrun).

Now demolished to north and west walls only, suspended over construction pit.

CROSS ST THOMAS TO EAST SIDE. 

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CONTINUE WEST ON ADELAIDE TO JOHN STREET, EAST SIDE TO SEE “MARSHALLS”

(north of Hooters on the NW corner of John and Adelaide)

STOP 16: JOHN BURNS CARRIAGE MANUFACTURERS, 126 JOHN ST., ARCHITECT UNKNOWN 1886 ADDITION TO THE NORTH, 1906-1906, BY WICKSON & GREGG ARCHITECTS WITH MARSH & CO., CONTRACTORS, FOR TURNBULL ELEVATOR MANUFACTURING CO.

Subsequent additions 1909, 1919. Now façade of Marshall’s and of the Scotia Bank Theatre at 259 Richmond Street West. Building designated 19 December, 1997.

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SOUTH ON JOHN ST. TO SOUTH OF ADELAIDE

STOP 17. RICHARD WEST AND CHARLES BANDER HOUSE, 1869, 104-106 JOHN STREET (NORTH OF KING WEST)

104-106 John Street (originally numbered 114 and 116) built 1870. Their first occupants were contractor Richard West and piano builder Charles Bander.

 

In 2011 the attached pair was moved east, onto a parking lot, to allow construction of the Pinnacle on Adelaide condo tower to the west of John Street (which contains a new Fox and Fiddle pub that used to be inside the West and Bander house.) 104-106 are now back on the west side of John Street relocated, 57 metres south of their original location at the corner of Adelaide to be beside 86 John Street that used to be the Duke of Argyle pub.

 

And they are back in business, as an example of three-dimensional facadism that conserves the outer fabric of the entire building that is now home to La Carnita restaurant at #104 and Sweet Jesus, ice cream parlor at #106. Building to the south now demolished.

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SOUTH TO KING STREET, CROSS TO SOUTH SIDE WALK LEFT (EAST) ALONG KING TO VIEW BUILDINGS TO BE DEMOLISHED OR INCORPORATED INTO THE MIRVISH+GEHRY PROJECT 

STOP 18: MIRVISH+GEHRY, 260-270, 274-322 KING STREET WEST 

The tallest Frank Gehry-designed structures in the world, proposed to rise to 301.55 metres and 329 metres. Royal Alexandra Theatre and Princess of Wales Theatres are retained in the new plan with facade of the Anderson Building as an entrance to a rental space in front of the sculpted metal wall of the west podium. OCAD University will have more than 2 floors of space in the east tower podium.

 

The Mirvish Gallery will be in the Eclipse Whitewear Building at the west end of the west block (across John Street from the TIFF Lightbox).

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To be facaded, incorporated into Mirvish+Gehry. Eclipse Whitewear Building, Gregg & Gregg, Architects, 1903 Princess of Wales Theatre, Lett Smith Architects, 1993 (at right)

 

Anderson Building, William Fazer, Architect, 1915 

RETURN WEST TO  JOHN ST, THEN SOUTH ON RIGHT SIDE TO MERCER ST. TURN RIGHT ON MERCER 

STOP 19: JOHN B. REID HOUSE, 24 MERCER STREET, JOHN ASPINWALL TULLY, ARCHITECT, 1857

Also known as the Alexander Johnson House). Designed for lawyer John B. Reid by John Aspinwall Tully, Architect (brother of the more famous Kivas Tully). One of the oldest buildings in the city and the sole historic survivor on what is now a narrow street south of King West, between John Street and Blue Jays Way.  In 2012 City Planning rejected a plan to demolish the house and replace it with a narrow, 21-storey tower.  
 
The impasse was resolved between Scott Morris Architects and the City by a motion that would reduce the height of the tower to 15 storeys, conserve the original, lower two storeys of the heritage facade, reserve the first three floors for commercial use and build without parking. In 2020 that project has yet to begin, 24 Mercer looks lonely and cramped but almost 160 years after it was built it’s façade remains.
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STOP 20: PILKINGTON GLASS 15. 19, 31 MERCER STREET, 1895-1969

ON SITE OF GEORGE VERRAL’S WEST END CAB STABLES, LANGLEY, LANGLEY & BURKE, ARCHITECTS, 1878. # 15 D. B. DICK, ARCHITECT, 1895),

# 19 BURKE, HORWOOD & WHITE, ARCHITECTS, 1910

# 31 HORWOOD & WHITE, ARCHITECTS, 1938)

NOBU HOTEL & RESIDENCES, STEPHEN TEEPLE, ARCHITECT FOR NOBU HOTELS (CHEF NOBU MATSUSHITA, ACTOR ROBERT DE NIRO, FILM PRODUCE MEIR TEPER)

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STOP 21: BISHA HOTEL AND RESIDENCES, 56 BLUE JAYS WAY, BECHARA KHABOUTH, ARCHITECT, 2017

(Lebanese name BISHA is familiar form of Bechara).

Originally George Crookshank House, 1834 “an important surviving example of an early 19th century Georgian-style house” with 6 over 6 windows. Third floor a later addition.

 

Built for George Crookshank (1792-1878), United Empire Loyalist, Receiver General of Public Accounts (1819-1820), member of the Legislative Council (1821-1841. 1878-1908, the building housed a private girls’ school. 1908 - 1922, headquarters of Dr. Barnardo’s Homes in Canada that settled young British immigrants on Canadian farms. 1990 Klub Max, 1994 Second City, 2005 Diesel Playhouse.

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NORTH ON BLUE JAYS WAY TO KING ST, BESIDE WESTINGHOUSE BLDG.

(Explore its interior entrance “plaza” for an interesting – maybe disturbing – experience.)

STOP 22: WESTINGHOUSE BUILDING, 355 KING STREET WEST AT BLUE JAYS WAY, BERNARD H. PRACK ARCHITECT, 1927 (DOUBLED IN HEIGHT, 1935) KING BLUE HOTEL AND CONDOS, PAGE + STEELE ARCHITECTS, 2015-2020

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The Westinghouse Building is incorporated into the podium of twin-towered, 48 and 44-storey condo, “King Blue”. The Westinghouse Building’s “Chicago Style” construction, that was adopted after the great fire of 1871, depends on steel skeleton framing rather than load-bearing masonry and allows large window openings and floor areas. Heritage Preservation Services recommended conservation of all four walls with the internal framing, but its advice was not supported by City Council.

 

Only the two most prominent walls with white terracotta trim and naming are saved and the framing (supplied by Hamilton Bridge) is gone. With no other means of support, the shell of the original building had to be supported by massive bracing during reconstruction. (See the Southam Press bldg..)   

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North and west-facing facades braced, remainder of building demolished. 

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West and north façade braced prior to completion of demolition.

NORTH ACROSS KING, CONTINUE UP PETER STREET, EAST SIDE

STOP 23: NEW YORK FURS, 342 ADELAIDE STREET EAST (WEST OF PETER) 1858

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“Vernacular applied facadism” (locally created, new over old) on a beautiful Victorian building prominently located at Adelaide and Peter Streets. (Such facadism may be seen on heritage residential buildings converted to business/retail/entertainment in many places in Toronto, including Kensington Market, Yorkville (Facadism Walk 2) Chinatown.)

Built for Frederick Perkins (with his brother George, owner of Perkins Inc. and Co., wholesale grocers, importers of wines and spirits who had a warehouse/shop at 43 Front St. E). 1876 purchased by Henry Strathy, head of the Federal Bank of Canada (at 17 Wellington Street West), who added the mansard roof.

“In 1923, New York Furs opened its doors to the public in what is now identified as Toronto’s fashion district. Since then, New York Furs has been a full-service fur store providing quality and customer care that comes second to none. Owners Chris and Peter Kotsaboikidis combined, share decades of experience in the fur trade and industry.”

STOP 24: TABLEAU CONDOS, 127 RICHMOND STREET WEST, 117 PETER STREET, WALLMAN ARCHITECTS, 2017

An building with a podium that Mussolini might have admired. 117 Peter Street façade restored/remade by ERA Architects in new materials, with a background of black brick rather than original red - to match the condo.

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STOP 24: WESTON BAKERY, 134 PETER STREET (AT RICHMOND) GEORGE ROBINSON HARPER, ARCHITECT 1910

Navy biscuits were baked here for troops during the First World War.

QUEEN RICHMOND CENTRE WEST, SWEENY & CO., ARCHITECTS, 2015

At QRC West, a spectacular alternative to heritage crushed; a building so humble, it is not listed as heritage, shares, with a trio of spectacular delta frames, support of an 11-storey crystal castle.

 

Designed by Dermott Sweeny for Allied Reit, completed, 2015, built to LEED Gold New Construction standards, QRC West is aimed especially at TAMI tenants who work in technology, arts, media and information.

 

Ricarda’s Restaurant in the ground floor of the Weston building. Offices of Sweeny & Co. Architects and of Allied REIT – conservators for 21C uses of 19C and early 20C business and industrial buildings in the “2 Kings” - King-Spadina, King-Parliament. 

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WALK ENDS SOUTH OF QUEEN AND PETER EAST OF SPADINA, WEST OF YONGE, STEPS NORTH TO THE BLACK BULL PUB